Aboriginal Preceptors

Barrie

Kelly Brownbill
Educator, Facilitator, Consultant
Kelly Brownbill's spirit name, Wabunnoongakekwe, means ‘Woman Who Comes from the East’ and she is proud to be WabizhashiDodem (Marten Clan). She is a member of the Flat Bay community of the Mi’kmaq Nation in Newfoundland. She currently lives near Barrie, Ontario, and has been an active member of the Aboriginal community in this area for the past 20 years. As an educator on Aboriginal issues, she has conducted countless cultural awareness training sessions across a broad range of service sectors. Key staff from both the provincial and federal governments have participated in Kelly’s training as have numerous front line service providers, particularly in the health care field. She has also worked with Aboriginal communities, both on and off reserve, to develop healthy agency models and to further develop counseling skills with Aboriginal clients. Kelly honours the wisdom and vision of her elders, both here and in the spirit realm, and acknowledges their guidance. She continues to seek their assistance on her ongoing journey. www.kellybrownbill.com This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Brampton

Jo-Anne Absolon
Program Coordinator/Manager, Peel Aboriginal Network
Boosho (Hello), my name is Jo-Anne Absolon. My mother is a full blooded Ojibway woman from Flying Post First Nation in Northern Ontario and she met and married my father who immigrated to Canada from Great Britain when he was 19 years old. My mother’s family were all traditional trappers and hunters and lived off the land. Growing up in Northern Ontario gave me the opportunity to spend time on the land and, like my ancestors, many lessons were learned. I consider myself privileged to carry some of the traditional knowledge of our ancestors. Over the years I have also had the opportunity to spend time learning from our traditional elders, knowledge keepers and medicine people. Currently, I am the Program Coordinator/Manager with the Peel Aboriginal Network and am completing a Liberal Arts Degree at the University of Waterloo. I love working with the grassroots community and have centered my work on improving the lives of others. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Guelph

Jo-Anne Absolon
Graduate Student in Master of Social Worker, Wilfred Laurier University
Boosho (Hello), my name is Jo-Anne Absolon. My mother is a full blooded Ojibway woman from Flying Post First Nation in Northern Ontario and she met and married my father who immigrated to Canada from Great Britain when he was 19 years old. My mother’s family were all traditional trappers and hunters and lived off the land. Growing up in Northern Ontario gave me the opportunity to spend time on the land and, like my ancestors, many lessons were learned. I consider myself privileged to carry some of the traditional knowledge of our ancestors. Over the years I have also had the opportunity to spend time learning from our traditional elders, knowledge keepers and medicine people. Currently, She was the Program Coordinator/Manager with the Peel Aboriginal Network and has completed a Liberal Arts Degree at the University of Waterloo. I love working with the grassroots community and have centered my work on improving the lives of others. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Kathy Absolon
Professor, Faculty of Social Work, Wilfrid Laurier University
Dr. Kathy Absolon is Anishinawbe kwe from Flying Post First Nation and teaches in the Aboriginal Field of Study, Faculty of Social Work at Wilfrid Laurier University. Kathy is the author of the book, “Kandossiwin, How We Come to Know” http://www.fernwoodpublishing.ca/Kaando ssiwin/ and has published articles on community healing, holistic practice and Indigenous methodologies of research. She has been involved in community healing, wellness and education for twenty years. Kathy received her PhD from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education with a focus on Aboriginal education and her MSW from Wilfrid Laurier University in 1991. She has been a social worker for twenty-five years with practical experience of working with Indigenous communities, individuals, groups and families. She is a cultural advocate and firmly believes that our road to wellness lies in the cultures, traditions and land based knowledge of her peoples. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Kitchener/Waterloo

Gerard Sagassige
Aboriginal Advisor Healing of 7 the Generations
Boozhoo.ahnii..saago.sekolie.waachey...Healing of the Seven Generations. As we braid truth, understanding and respect and we plant seeds to our self healing, we as indigenous must understand our creation story and modern history before and after 1492. We/I have been very honored with responsible love, responsible determination and most importantly responsible respect for each individual spirit who embraces US (7generations) into their circle of life. We at H7G braid self cultural compassion, individual migration and self-care and awareness to improve the health of individuals, families and communities. … miigwech..niaya. Gerard currently works as an Aboriginal Advisor in circles and embraces the seed to inner healing, the child of spirit. He has been actively advocating for well over 30 years for the identified historical migration of despair and the growth of healing within traditional practice process as well as western ways of healing. He currently does regional and community outreach work in the areas of Homestead, Education and Health. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Kingston

Laura Maracle
Aboriginal Student Success Strategist, Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre Queen’s University, Kingston, ON
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I am a mixed-race woman who has made the conscious decision to live my life according to Haudenosaunee tradition. My biological father was an Anishinabe man and my mother is of French/ Irish descent. The father who raised me is Mohawk and that is how I know Tyendinaga as my home today. I was born and raised in Toronto, where I spent the first twenty-two years of my life. Thereafter, I claimed my identity, language and culture (to the best of my ability) and have been sitting (with the Bear Clan) and learning in the longhouse with the traditional Haudenosaunee people of Tyendinaga. My work experience is diverse and covers the fields of administration, legal secretary (corporate and criminal law), Aboriginal employment and Aboriginal education. My passion, heart and soul lies in the field of Aboriginal education. Having taught from early childhood right up to Adult Education, the biggest life lessons I have gained came from teaching at-risk youth at the high-school level. Currently, my path has taken me back to the world of Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education, while raising two beautiful daughters. I currently work at Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre (Queen’s University) as the Aboriginal Student Success Strategist. My objective is to assist our Aboriginal youth in any way possible, to accept, acknowledge and honour who they are and to help bridge the gaps as a result of colonialism, through resource sharing, supporting, advocating, liaison, listening, story-telling, teaching, and most importantly, by role-modelling.
Maureen Buchanan
Nurse Practitioner, Napanee Community Health Centre
Maureen Buchanan, MSc., RN, is Anishnaabe-kwe, and a member of Batchewana First Nation. She was raised off reserve in a small town in Ontario. She has worked as a Nurse for over 20 years and has recently joined the Napanee Community Health Center as a Nurse Practitioner where she is a champion for an emerging Aboriginal Health Program for off-reserve First Nations. Her grandmother taught her that everyone has a story and that we should respectfully listen to those stories in order to understand what it means to walk a mile in another person’s moccasins. In order to provide culturally safe healthcare, one must understand the story of colonization and the impact on First Nation communities, families and individuals. Maureen hopes to work with others to disseminate this understanding and extend the reach of empathic, respectful, and culturally safe health care practices for First Nations people. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Ottawa

Michelle Sault
Principal Consultant, CornerStone Concepts
Michelle Sault, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed. is the Principal Consultant of CornerStone Concepts, an Aboriginal owned consulting company with focus in the areas of program development, program evaluation & facilitation. Michelle is Anishnawbekwe and a proud member of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation. As a professional facilitator Michelle has conducted sessions across the country in an effort to cultivate understandings of the shared history between First Nations and non-First Nations in Canada and the historical implications of this relationship. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

London

Bonnie Doxtator
Senior's Health Advocate, Supporting Aboriginal Seniors at Home, Southwest Ontario Aboriginal Health Access Centre
Bonnie is a member of the Oneida Nation of the Thames, Turtle Clan, and her family roots are from Aamjiwnaang First Nation. She has been with the SOAHAC team since December 2008. Bonnie has been working within the First Nation Community, both on and off reserve, for approximately 20 years as a front line health care worker. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  
Joslyn Jamieson
Forensic Toxicologist, London Ontario
Joslyn is a Mohawk of the Turtle Clan and is originally from Six Nations of the Grand River. In her early years her grandmother taught her holistic bio- dynamic agriculture and horticulture. She has a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Brock University in St. Catharines, as well as an Advanced Diploma as a Biotechnology Technologist – Forensics from Sir Sandford Fleming College in Peterborough. During her internship for the biotechnology program she worked in an ancient DNA laboratory. At both post-secondary institutions she played a vital role in bringing the Aboriginal culture into the college/university atmosphere through student clubs, and she sat on the Aboriginal Education Councils for both Brock University and Sir Sandford Fleming College, acting as an advocate for Aboriginal students. Joslyn also is an Aboriginal singer, drummer, and artist, currently working in London, Ontario. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Guy Hagar

Cultural Safety Trainer, Southwest Ontario Aboriginal Health Access Centre, Supporting Aboriginal Seniors at Home
Guy Hagar has worked as the 2nd Vice President & area representative to the Ontario Native Education Counselling Association (ONECA), he has been an Instructor on Current Native Issues for the Ontario Native Education Counselling Association (ONECA), an Education Counsellor for the Niagara South Board of Education, a Co- chair of the Brock University Aboriginal Education Council, the Chair of the Niagara College Aboriginal Education Council, an Independent consultant/trainer on First Nations issues, (Lateral Violence, Suicide, Anger Management etc.), and has worked as an Aboriginal Health Advocate Developer. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

North Bay

Katie Carmichael
University of Toronto
Ms. Katherine (Katie) Carmichael is currently completing her Master's in Nursing (Community Health) at the Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto. In her final practicum with Dr. Michele Parent, at Nipissing University she is engaged in dissemination of research on Aboriginal nursing education. Katherine is also a Registered Nurse at the North Bay Regional Health Centre where she practices in palliative, dementia and rehabilitation services. Since obtaining her BScN (Canadore/Nipissing Collaborative Program) in 2009, Katherine has been interested in the fields of nursing education, public health, and Aboriginal health. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

Judy Manitowabi

Associate Director, Aboriginal Learning Unit, Canadore College
An educator for 31 years, Judy has recently moved from the secondary school system as a teacher to the post secondary environment to Canadore College. Developing community based partnerships and programming as well as working closely with faculty and staff within the college are key areas of responsibility. With well over 430 full time Aboriginal students within the college, ensuring student success is a priority. A member of Nipissing First Nation, Judy is Odawa, originally from Wikwemikong Unceded Indian Reserve on Manitoulin Island. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Michele Parent

Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, Nipissing University
Dr. Michèle Parent is currently Assistant Professor and researcher at Nipissing University School of Nursing where up until recently she also worked as Director of the School. Dr. Parent is first generation post- secondary learner. She was raised by her Algonquin grandmother, Hélène Beads-Babin who instilled in her strong beliefs about higher education and its impacts on our lives. Her background with Aboriginal People is also immersed in her practice as outpost nurse and in her strong relationships with the Dogrib People of the North West Territories. Dr. Parent ’s research interests focus on the effectiveness of health care programs, program planning and evaluation, health policy, population health, and health professional education for Aboriginal learners. Dr. Parent has expertise in conducting Delphi research techniques with and for Aboriginal People for the purpose of building concensus. Dr. Parent is an Aboriginal health scholar who received support from the Aboriginal Nurses Association of Canada, the Métis Nation of Ontario, CIHR’s Institute of Aboriginal Peoples' Health, and the National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Oshawa

Peggy Forbes
Aboriginal Student Success Facilitator, Durham College
Hello, my name is Peggy Forbes and I am a descendent of the Alogonquins of Golden Lake. I am currently working at Durham College in Oshawa as the Aboriginal Student Success Facilitator. I have a degree in Indigenous Studies from Trent University and have been working in the Aboriginal community for over 15 years. I feel quite passionately about assisting in the improvement of Aboriginal health and education in addition to expanding the cultural knowledge of non- Aboriginal people. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 Julie Pigeon

Aboriginal Student Success Facilitator, Durham College
Greetings my name is Julie Pigeon and I am a band member of Batchewana First Nation with additional family ties at Chippewas of Nawash. I am a proud mother of two amazing children. I currently work as Durham Colleges Aboriginal Student Success Facilitator at their brand new Aboriginal Student Centre. I have a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Toronto with a double major in Sociology and Crime and Deviance. I have worked in the Aboriginal community for the last 15 years, and am dedicated to improving the lives of Aboriginal peoples and ensuring that our voices are heard. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Peterborough

Kylie Fox
Aboriginal Student Success Facilitator, Aboriginal Student Services, Fleming College
I am Anishnaabe and my Aboriginal ancestry comes through my father and grandfather who are members of the Wikwemikong Unceded Indian Reserve on Manitoulin Island, although I was raised in the Greater Toronto Area and spent most of my time visiting with family in Henvey Inlet First Nation (just south of Sudbury, Ontario). My recent work experiences include working on Aboriginal related initiatives and projects with the Ministry of Government Services, Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs, and the Ministry of Natural Resources. Most recently, I began working at Fleming College, as the Aboriginal Student Success Facilitator. In this role I enjoy working with Aboriginal students on campus, and facilitate with programming and cultural workshops that promote Aboriginal student success. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

Laraine Hale

Aboriginal Counsellor, Fleming College
Laraine is a Social Worker by profession and has spent over 20 years investing in the lives of individuals, families, groups and communities. Her work has spanned the roles of frontline worker, supervisor, professor and consultant in the fields of Child Welfare, Mental Health, Aboriginal Mental Health and Human Services. As the Aboriginal Counsellor, Laraine cultivates the partnership between Fleming College, Aboriginal students and their communities. Respectful of languages, traditions, customs and cultures, students with Aboriginal ancestry are supported in balancing their academic, emotional, physical and spiritual development. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Catherine McCready

Coordinator, Aboriginal Emphasis InitiativeSchool of Law, Justice & Community ServicesSutherland Campus
I am a Mother and Educator working through education to strengthen relations between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities. My interest and work began with the environmental sector spending time in northern James Bay Nehiyaw communities to understand the socio-economic impacts of hydroelectric development. My interest and work experience has revolved around rights, specifically Aboriginal self-government rights as they relate to the rights of First Nations, M étis and Inuit peoples to maintain the integrity of their internal language and cultural communities. I continue to look at the importance and potential of acculturating institutions (government, education et cetera) to the realities of Canada’s First Peoples as a means to remove cultural barriers. Currently, I am the Coordinator of the Aboriginal Emphasis Initiative in the School of Law, Justice and Community Services at Fleming College. In addition to my teaching responsibilities in the areas of political science, diversity education and Aboriginal Justice I provide support to administration, faculty, and students regarding Aboriginal Education. My role as Coordinator is to ensure that Fleming College’s commitment to be inclusive of First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples is reflected throughout curriculum across a variety of academic disciplines. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Sudbury

Susan Manitowabi
Assistant Professor,School of Native Human Services,Laurentian University
Susan has been a professor in the Native Human Services Program since 2003. Susan is Anishinawbe-Kwe from Wikwemikong Unceded Indian Reserve and was raised in Wiigwaaskingaa (Whitefish River First Nation).She has two degrees from Laurentian – BA in Sociology (1980) and an HBSW in Native Human Services(2002); a MSW with a specialization in Policy, Organization and Community Development (2003) from University of Toronto and is currently working on her PhD in the School of Rural and Northern Health at Laurentian. Her doctoral work focuses on mental health policies, programs, and best practices for Native communities, as well as the integration of traditional healing approaches in mental health service delivery. Her research interests include, Aboriginal Mental Health, Aboriginal Child Welfare, Culturally Appropriate Consultation and Research Methods, Aboriginal mental health policy development and community development. Having worked in First Nations communities, specifically in the addictions and mental health fields, she is familiar with the issues facing Aboriginal people and continues to work towards improving their situation. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Timmins

Gary Martin
Traditional Healer Coordinator,Misiway MilopemahtesewinCommunity Health Centre
My real name is “White Wolf.” My Christian name is Gary Martin. I’m with the Moose Cree First Nation. I was raised in a very remote community called Moose River Crossing. I now reside in Timmins and have been living here for the past 30 some years. I am presently employed with Misiway Milopemahtesewin Community Health Centre as Traditional Healer Coordinator.I have four daughters, Roxanne, Jessica, Cheryl and Emmy-Lou, the two oldest girls have given me eight wonderful grandchildren. I love the bush life. i.e. hunting, fishing and teaching my grandchildren how to respect and care for the land.I have been following the traditional way of life since I can remember. I have a tremendous amount of respect for Mother Earth and her abundance of food and medicine for the people. It was through the teachings that I was able to find the true White Wolf, along with the roles and responsibilities that came with the name. This name means that I (white wolf) am a leader and am responsible for taking care of the people, family and/or community...this also means taking care of the culture and traditional practices that are very important to our people. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Thunder Bay

Elder Gerry Martin
Traditional Healer
Gerry Martin (English name) is a former nurse with more recent training in Medical Office Administration assistant and a student of traditional Aboriginal healing methods. He hails from the Mattagami First Nation of Ojibways in Northeastern Ontario near Timmins. Gerry feels very comfortable teaching, learning and sharing his knowledge of traditional Aboriginal Healing methods and considers it a life-long goal. He is a son, father, grandfather and great grandfather who follows his destiny and enjoys life to the fullest. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Toronto

Vanessa Ambtman

Community Engagement ConsultantToronto Central Local Health Integration Network (LHIN)
Vanessa Ambtman is an Aboriginal woman of Cree origin, originally from the Athabasca area in Alberta. She presently resides in Toronto, but grew up in Winnipeg. She works for the Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network (TC LHIN) as a Community Engagement Consultant, and is the Aboriginal health lead. Vanessa has worked in the field of Aboriginal Health Promotion and Education for 10 years prior to working for the LHIN, and has worked at both the local and Provincial level including positions at the De dwa da dehs nye>s Aboriginal Health Centre and at the Ontario Federation of Indian Friendship Centres. She received her Bachelor’s Degree from Trent University majoring in Native Studies.Vanessa has designed, developed and implemented numerous health projects and programs for Aboriginal communities, focusing on areas such as healthy lifestyles, nutrition, physical activity, diabetes and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). She has developed resources, training sessions and manuals utilizing an innovative and culture- based approach. She believes in the dissemination of promising practices, and has conducted workshops provincially and nationally, including conferences like the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA), National Aboriginal Diabetes Association (NADA), National Aboriginal Health Organization (NAHO), and the University of Oklahoma Native Diabetes Conference. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Pat Chrisjohn

Peel Aboriginal Network, Brampton Ontario
Pat Chrisjohn was born and raised on Oneida First Nation, Patricia has lived in the Region of Peel since 1989. She has a degree in Urban and Regional Planning from Ryerson Polytechnic Institute. Her experience with the Aboriginal community includes employment with the Union of Ontario Indians, Oneida First Nation, Ontario Native Women’ s Association Local 2 in Toronto, a joint project funded by Ontario Federation of Indian Friendship Centres, Ontario Native Women’s Association and the Ontario Metis and Non Status Indian Association. As well she was a board member for Anduhyaun Native Women’s Residence (in Toronto) and a founding member of the Toronto Native Women’s Resource Centre. She has also worked for various levels of government including the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (Planning Section), Employment and Immigration Canada (as a Native Employment Counsellor and an Aboriginal Consultant) and for the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (Senior Policy Analyst focusing on Aboriginal employment and training programs and services.) Since 2003, Pat has been involved with the development of the Peel Aboriginal Network (PAN) and as a Co-Chair on the PAN Circle of Directors she has helped to establish a Cultural Centre in Brampton. Currently, Pat is a Policy Analyst with the Region of Peel Human Services Department and she is a member of the Region’s Peel Aboriginal Steering Committee (PASC). This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Miriam Johnston

Senior SpecialistProvincial Programs BranchMinistry of Health and Long-Term Care
Miriam Johnston is a Program Manager with the Community Services Unit, Provincial Programs Branch, Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. The Community Services Unit oversees a number of provincial programs including supportive housing, mental health and addictions and the ministry's contribution to the Aboriginal Healing and Wellness Strategy. She has also worked for Health Canada and was previously the Coordinator for the Aboriginal Health Office, Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. She has been involved in a number of Aboriginal health initiatives including: Aboriginal Health Transition Fund (AHTF); Aboriginal Healing and Wellness Strategy (AHWS); Ontario Aboriginal Diabetes Strategy; Aboriginal Problem Gambling; Aboriginal Child Nutrition and FASD; and the Aboriginal Healthy Babies, Healthy Children Program. Miriam Johnston is Anishnawbe-kwe and a member of the Chippewas of Nawash First Nation. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

Marilyn Morley

Policy Analyst,Ontario Federation of Indian Friendship Centres research
Marilyn Morley is employed at the Ontario Federation of Indian Friendship Centres (OFIFC) as a Health Policy Analyst-Special Projects and the OFIFC Research Liaison for Our Health Counts-A Baseline Population Health Database for Urban Aboriginal People in Ontario. She is a highly experienced educator, lecturer and philanthropist specializing in global Indigenous cultural perspectives on health and wellness, protection of traditional knowledge and practices and the development and promotion of equitable access to quality, culturally expressive, Indigenous health and social services. Marilyn infuses an innovative, creative approach to all of her professional work in alternative health, human services, health policy and promotion. She has over 25 years of extensive and diverse employment experiences in a wide range of health portfolios in British Columbia, Manitoba and Ontario.Marilyn’s international humanitarian portfolio includes working with the traditional Indigenous Wisdom Keepers of Peru and empowering small Peruvian communities to develop and maintain sustainable activities in spiritual, social and economic realms. She is a Cree woman from Waskaganish, Quebec and is an Indigenous drummer, dancer and artist. Marilyn is also an Alternative Health Practitioner and is currently taking her Doctorate in Homeopathy with the Toronto School of Homeopathic Medicine. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Nicole Tanguay
Advocacy Coordinator, Native Women’s Resource Centre
Nicole Tanguay is of Cree and French heritage and is a two- spirited woman. Nicole has an honours degree in Aboriginal studies and English and has worked with in the Aboriginal community in Toronto since the early 1990’s. Before moving to Toronto, Nicole worked for five years in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver within the Aboriginal community. Nicole's employment history includes working in the HIV/AIDS sector as well as a life skills coach and community developer. Nicole currently works as an Advocacy Coordinator at the Native Women's Resource Centre. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Waterloo

Jo-Anne Absolon
Graduate Student in Master of Social Worker, Wilfred Laurier University
Boosho (Hello), my name is Jo-Anne Absolon. My mother is a full blooded Ojibway woman from Flying Post First Nation in Northern Ontario and she met and married my father who immigrated to Canada from Great Britain when he was 19 years old. My mother’s family were all traditional trappers and hunters and lived off the land. Growing up in Northern Ontario gave me the opportunity to spend time on the land and, like my ancestors, many lessons were learned. I consider myself privileged to carry some of the traditional knowledge of our ancestors. Over the years I have also had the opportunity to spend time learning from our traditional elders, knowledge keepers and medicine people. I was the Program Coordinator/Manager with the Peel Aboriginal Network and have recently completed a Liberal Arts Degree at the University of Waterloo. I love working with the grassroots community and have centered my work on improving the lives of otherelph . This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Windsor

Theresa Sims
Aboriginal Healthy Babies, Healthy Children CoordinatorCanAm Indian Friendship Centre
Theresa Sims has worked as a provincial trainer for on-line teachings for twenty-six Native Literacy programs. She has also worked as a Traditional Teacher and resource person for the Ontario Native Literacy Coalition, as well as a Provincial trainer and Resource Person for the Ontario Provincial Police. Other experience includes work as a Cultural Teacher at Kingston and Bath Penitentiaries, a Drummer and Singer for the Symphony of Windsor, an Elder for the Local Health Integration Network, and a Traditional Teacher for the University of Windsor, Windsor Essex School Boards, McMaster University, Fort Erie Native Friendship Centre and Hamilton Regional Indian Centre. She is currently the CEO and President of the Native Women of Windsor organization, whose objective is to educate the public regarding the history, values, culture, language and traditions of Aboriginal people through the re-discovery and development of the traditional skills unique to the Aboriginal Culture. Their vision includes an Aboriginal community which understands and respects the diversity and uniqueness of all Aboriginal Nations and takes responsibility in selecting its leader(s) who are role models for our children, youth and the next seven generations. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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